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New Content on Footnote!

Back on January 10, we announced our partnership with The National Archives. At the time, we already had over 4 million images primarily consisting of NARA documents that had never been on the Web before. Even more exciting is the vast amounts of new content that will be hitting Footnote throughout the year. We have just started work on three new titles. The first batch of images are available now.

Miscellaneous Papers of the Continental Congress (1774-1789) Consists mainly of papers relating to foreign, naval, and fiscal affairs; papers relating to specific states; and papers kept by the Office of the Secretary of Congress.
Sample Image: A cipher document written by John Jay – Click here

General Photographs of the Fine Arts Commission – Photos and illustrations of subjects including the Founding Fathers, cities, monuments, memorials, etc.
Sample Images: Early illustration of the Philadelphia Museum of Art – Click here

World War II Photos of Japanese Soldiers and of Allied Prisoners of War

New Titles Coming Soon to Footnote

  • Domestic Letters of the Department of State from 1784-1906
  • Revolutionary War Pensions
  • Foreign Letters of the Continental Congress and Department of State from 1785-1790
  • Ratified Indian Treaties
  • Amistad Collection
  • Presidential Photo Collections featuring Coolidge, FDR, Truman and Eisenhower

3 Comments

  1. How about a special section of documents for students to view and use for free? As a genealogist, I am excited about this but giving back to education could make you heroes for life!

  2. We do have many free documents on the site, but we certainly need to do a better job of letting people know what they are. We’re working on that.

    The two main sets of free images on the site are the Pennsylvania Archives and the American Milestone Documents.

    The goal of the American Milestone Documents was to gather some of those documents that would be valuable to students and provide them for free. If you have suggestions of documents that would be good for that collection, we’d love to hear them.