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Introducing Civil War Stories!

Do you have an ancestor that fought in the Civil War? We are beyond excited to launch the first phase of our new Civil War Stories, an ambitious project that ultimately hopes to create a comprehensive list of every soldier that fought in the Civil War, the company and regiment he belonged to, the battles he fought in, and finally what happened to each soldier following the war.

How can we possibly do this? We have created new technology allowing us to gather data from Ancestry®, Fold3®, Newspapers.com™, Find a Grave®, and other sources. Next, we are teaming up with the American Battlefield Trust and their Civil War experts to integrate their amazing collections of stories, videos, and photographs into our new experience. Stitching all of these collections together, we have created the first of its kind searchable database of Civil War soldiers, regiments and battles. The human cost of the Civil War was astounding. The proportion of deaths to the population was greater than any other conflict in American history. Nearly 3% of the population died – roughly comparable to 6-10 million Americans today.

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This was the last war where companies enlisted from home communities. Soldiers were often related to others in the company, and all shared a sense of connection. If a company endured losses in a battle, there was a dramatic impact back in their hometown. This will also help tell the story of the families left behind. We want to help you paint a picture of how the Civil War impacted your family tree!

How will this rollout? We will begin with the major Civil War battles. Starting today, you can head to our Civil War Stories page and learn details about some of the major Civil War battles, including what regiments fought in each battle.

And then starting with North Carolina Regiments, you will be able to see regiment timelines. When did they muster in? Where did they fight? Who were the officers? Eventually, we will add the ability to refine down to company. By the time this project is complete, you’ll be able to map out your soldier’s movements throughout the war.

Finally, we’ll add individual soldiers state by state beginning with North Carolina, followed by New York. We realize that you may know details about your Civil War soldier that nobody else does. Do you have family records, photographs or journals that have been passed down? We’re going to provide a way for you to contribute to this Civil War Stories collection. Maybe your journal mentions other soldiers in the same company. Now their ancestors will be able to share your data. 

You can see why we’re so excited about Civil War Stories. Watch for updates throughout the year. If you would like to contribute any research/photographs/letters to be included in this project, visit https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! To learn more about this, head to our Civil War Stories page today!

469 Comments

  1. My great Uncle, Page Tallman was in the 14th New York Heavy Artillery, He lied about his age and enlisted in 1863 at age 15. He was mortally wounded March 25, 1865 in Robert E. Lee’s 6:00AM attack at the Battle of Ft. Stedman at Petersburg, VA in the last major battle of the Civil War. According to his muster roll abstract, he died March 26, 1865 “in the hands of the enemy” at the Confederate General Hospital, Petersburg. Every year I place a wreath from Wreaths Across America on an unknown soldier’s grave at Poplar Grove Cemetery on the Petersburg Battlefield where so many from his unit died in the attack and are buried.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  2. My great great grandfather Briscoe Hedges and his brother both lived in Kentucky. Briscoe fought for the North and his brother fought for the south in the civil war.

    • One of my ancestors James H. Wright aka Doc traveled to western Kentucky from Alabama the beginning and fought for the confederates. The seventeen year old was afraid he would miss the war.There were only two battalions that were officially in the confederate army. My ancestor, Doc fought in one of them. I wonder if the brother was in one of these battalions.

      Doug

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  3. My great, great grandfather, David Story 3rd, enlisted in K Company, 5th Infantry, VT. He was wounded at Savage Station, taken prisoner, exchanged and sent to Episcopal Hospital Philadelphia where he died. His body was shipped back to VT for burial. His brother Isaac also served in the war. I have a picture of him in uniform. He wrote letters back home to his family which the family had saved. So that they may be properly preserved, I donated them to the New England Historic and Genealogical Society in Boston.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  4. Both GR-GR Grandfathers fought for the 14th KY Inf. (Union).
    One brother fought for the south. They were in two battles fighting
    against each other!

    • My gr-gr grandfather was in Co. B of Ky 14th Inf. His name was Thomas Prince, Jr. from Lawrence County, Ky. My dad was orphaned as a child, so that part of our history doesn’t have much oral tradition. Suppose our relatives knew each other?

    • My gg grandfather was also in the 14KY Inf. . (Union) in Co. G. There used to be a web site on the 14rth Ky., but it appears to have changed into a fb page. My ancestor was wounded by an artillery shell at the Battle of Atlanta and did not continue on with Sherman on the March to the sea John David Preston has written a book (2008), “The Civil War in the Big Sandy Valley of Kentucky” and there are several references to the 14th Ky. in Earl J. Hess’s Kennesaw Mt. (2013). The 14th K. was united with an Ohio Regiment under General [later Pres.] James Garfield’s command early in the war.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  5. My great great half uncle George Cubbage was with the 149th Bucktails from Allegheny county Pennsylvania fought and died in St Peterburg, Va. He is buried at Poplar Grove. His step brother was with the same 149th Bucktails John Banks Holland. I have a picture of John and several other vets standing in front of Little Round at Gettysburg, Pa. It was take some time around a annniversary reunion for the Bucktails.

    • 149th PA Bucktails company B Captain Zarah Corsica McCullough and company E pvt James Lawrence McCullough survived Gettysburg. Fought McPherson’s Ridge & Farm. My maternal Grandmother’s father and uncle. Clearfield county. Names on battlefield memorial.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  6. I have many Civil War weapons I have collected over the years.
    Some are listed on gunbroker.

    • Greg, we’d love to have photographs of your weapon collection. We could add it to Fold3. Please reach out to me at [email protected] if you are interested in sharing those photos.

  7. My Great Grandfather served in the 42nd Mississippi Infantry, Company A. He was wounded twice, once thru the mouth, second in the stomach. He survived both. We have his hand written account of the first incident. He said he was so close to the guy who shot him, he could see his eye color. He was left for dead on the battlefield.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  8. My French Canadian ancestors emigrated from Canada to various parts of the U.S. Cousins and uncles fought for several different units including Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania AND Louisiana !!

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  9. My paternal ggf, John B Galloway, enlisted in CO. B 32nd MS in 1861 as an 18 year old, with his friends and neighbors. Ultimately, He was captured in North GA and was sent to the Rock Island, IL POW camp. He then enlisted as a “Galvanized “ Yankee and was sent west to protect the stage route in Northern Colorado. He completed that service and returned to north MS where he married my Ggm Mary T.”Mollie” McGee whose brother had been mortally wounded at Gettysburg. Unfortunately, John B. died in 1883.

    I think this new database is a great idea.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  10. Four of my eight great-great grandfathers fought in the Civil War. All four from Virginia. One died while a POW at Fort Delaware.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  11. My GG Grandfather, Verenus Hiram Ryder was a molder in a foundry when he volunteered and enlisted 17 August 1864. He served in Defense of Washington with Company K, Massachusetts 4th Heavy Artillery Regiment. He mustered out 17 June 1865. Returning to his home unscathed, he resumed his work as a molder in the Wakefield, Massachusetts foundry.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  12. My Paternal Great Grandfather, George Rush Plasket (one t) served in the 30th Iowa Battery. He was at Vicksburg. I have in my possession a letter and detailed map of the Mississippi situation on March 21, 1863. He was wounded in battle on May 22, 1863. He was promoted to Full 5th Sergeant on 20 Jan. 1965.
    The effects of the wound to his right arm continued for the rest of his life.
    The letter and drawing are my most prized possessions. We are a small family. We wish to donate the documents to the proper institution, as they would be destroyed after my death. I am 82.

    • Sharon, I am George’s 7TH COUSIN FOUR TIMES REMOVED. If you could send me a copy that letter and drawing, will see that it gets preserved with him on familysearch.org. George is already there but that information is not.

      Gilbert Abbe
      [email protected]
      601-831-3091

    • Take a copy and donate to a war museum………………

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  13. My gg grandfather, Nathaniel Levi Jones, was KIA on 20 Feb 1854 during the battle of Olustee/Ocean Pond FL. He was from Pike County GA and enlisted in the GA 64th.

  14. Three of my four great-grandfathers were in the Civil War; the fourth, who lived in northwestern Georgia, was too young. All were from small-farm families.

    Of the three who served, one lived in eastern Tennessee, one in northwestern Georgia, and one in central Alabama.
    –The Tennessean enlisted as a Private from Greene County in the Union Army in 1862, joining 1st TN Cavalry Regiment, Co. “L” and served for the duration of the War. He fought in many skirmishes and in battles in Nashville, Chattanooga, Atlanta and lastly Franklin. After the war, he lived in Chattanooga TN, and later was employed as a “guardian” at the nearby Chickamauga Battlefield after it opened.
    –The Georgian enlisted as a 3rd Lt from Chattooga County in the Confederate Army in 1861, joining the 9th GA Inf Reg, Co. “B” and served in several key battles until severely wounded at Gettysburg on 2 July 1863. He was transported to Richmond’s to Chimborazo Hospital where he eventually recovered. “Unable to endure the rigors of forced march” (his letter), he served out the war on Home Guard duty at the Macon GA Armory. He soon moved to Cartersville GA to return to teaching, opening a small rural school there.
    –The Alabamian was conscripted at age 17 as a Pvt from Macon County in 1864, joining the 63rd AL Inf Reg, Co “A” (the “Boy Regiment”) and served out the War until captured at Spanish Fort/Blakeley. He was confined on Ship Island MS until the war ended, then transported to Natchez MS and released, then by rail to near Montgomery AL, from where he walked home. He later became a teacher, a Populist representative in 1890 to the State Legislature, and lastly a 1900 Census Enumerator.

    • Oops. Forgot to add names:
      –Tennessean was William Henderson Jones
      –Georgian was Lewis Beman Millican.
      –Alabamian was James Rufus Simmons.
      –(Georgian who was too young was William Hannah Rickett)

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  15. My 4x Great Grandfather
    John Lewis Burgess served under Jeb Stuart in the light horse artillery regiment. He told my great great grandmother (whom lived until 1994) a story about Gettysburg. He said that during action at Spangler Springs he was getting water from the spring for wounded along side Union Soldiers doing the same, an unspoken pact between both sides. He was later captured during the Wilderness campaign and held prisoner at Point Lookout, Maryland.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  16. My great great grandfather died at Fredericksburg on May 3, 1863 according to records found. He was in the 141st Infantry Company E Pennsylvania. I would like more info on how to find where he was buried, the circumstances of his death, etc. His name was Charles H Packard.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  17. This is great. I have a copy of my 2nd great uncle’s journal regarding his service in the 35th NYVI. I donated the original to the NY Military Museam, but have transcripts that I can add.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  18. My great grandfather left a book of poems about the battles he witnessed…
    He specially admired General Hooker.. Yes, he was a Yankee…

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  19. My ggg grandfather Asbury Mapes , 55th Illinois regiment, fought at the battle of Shiloh . He was severely wounded in the spine April 6th, 1862 and sent down the river to Camp Dennison , Ohio where he died April 26th,1862. He is buried in the Civil War section of Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati, Ohio.We visited Shiloh and stood where he would of fought. It was a sobering and emotional moment, knowing the loss of life on both sides.

    • Many of my relatives had farms near the Shiloh battlefield at that time. Some of them even regularly attended church services at the Shiloh church. My G Grandmother grew up on a farm on the Corinth – Pittsburg Landing road, about 8 miles southwest of the Shiloh church. she remembered the (probably Confederate) soldiers marching by their house.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  20. My gg grandfather on my dad’s side was captured by Grant at the battle of Ft. Henry. He was sent to the Union prison in Alton, IL. My gg grandfather on my mother’s side was a prison guard there. Their grandchildren met in CA in 1932. They were my parents.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  21. My Grandfather and his brother both fought in the Civil War. I have other family members who served but have gotten all their information yet. Thank you for honoring them.

  22. My Great-grandfather was in the 5th Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, Company B, Union Army. He served from July 4th, 1861-Sept. 1864. His name was spelled a couple of different ways—-George Conselman, Canselman, Counselman. We always spelled it Councilman. From ancestry I found his newspaper obit in 1903 and the spelling was Kunzelman. I would like to learn everything I can.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  23. I have a portion of the diary of my 2nd Great Grandfather who was mustered in New York, discharged and mustered in again. It talks about prototype guns, meeting Lincoln and day to day struggles. It put many pieces of my ancestry questions together. At the end as he musters out he runs into his brother-in-law in Georgia. It’s an amazing read!

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  24. My Maternal Great Grandfather, Private Robert M. Crawford enlisted March 21, 1864. He served in Company D, Wisconsin 37th Infantry Regiment and served until the time of his discharge, by reason of disability. He was taken Prisoner July 30, 1864 at Petersburg, Virginia; absent at M.O. of Regt. His obituary states he spent three months in Libby prison. Since my research I have learned Robert was sent to Danville Prison and was soon paroled and discharged at Parole Camp. My Mom remembers being told her Grandpa weighed eighty some pounds when he was released. I am proud to say I have Robert’s 1847 Springfield Musket that he used in the Civil War and the musket will be passed down to my nephew who is very interested in the Civil War. I would love to find any information about Robert, a picture in uniform, a letter and especially any details of him being in Danville Prison. Robert’s obituary states he was loyal and true to his country. Thank You Great Grandfather for serving our Country in the Civil War.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  25. Hi, my 2nd great grandfather, Peter Adams Hanger, who lived in Shannon County MO was medically discharged from the Confederate Army in 1863. And the 7th Kansas in February of 1865 took him and another man into the woods and shot and killed them. Peter was 50 years old at this time. There is an article that was written in 2011…. Death of Peter Hanger – Line Bred Rebel. I found this while doing research, needless to say, I find this story extremely sad. Peter and his wife had a lot of children, some still young at this time. It seemed a senseless act that was done by the 7th Kansas. I feel my 2nd great grandfather’s story should be told and his voice heard since it was snuffed out in such a horrible manner with no regard for his or the other man’s life. Thank you for your time, Karen

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  26. My great great grandfather Michael Philip Usina was also known as the man with the dog. He was out of Savannah and the youngest blockade runner in history. He was Company B , 8th Georgia Infantry. He was a loyal man and well known in the shipping circles. He later founded the Usina & Jones Dry docks on Hutchinson Island in Savannah,GA.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  27. I’ll be happy to participate. Nearly every male in my family between the age of 15 to 50 was in the Confederate Army.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  28. 1, The National Guard still recruits largely locally manned units. See the 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division, which suffered heavily on D-Day.
    Today,company level units are mostly local, Battalion HQ are mostly local at the enlisted level, with some officers serving a long distance from home depending on where the open slots are. Brigade and higher HQ have a lot of senior NCOs also coming from outside the area.
    2.
    BG Maxcy Gregg served under Jackson, killed at Fredericksburg. My great great grandmother was his niece so we are his closest living relatives.
    Captain Robert George Chisolm served in several different SC militia units until called up to serve at Petersburg. He received a leg injury, but not sure it was combat related. He got the best care, though. His cousin Julian Chisolm was a senior sugeon in the Confederate army and wrote the manual on field medicine.
    Melchior Hay Horn Jr. was a junior member of Gov Andrew Gregg Curtin’s staff involved in raising volunteer units for the army. Was mobilized as a militia major during the Antietam Campaign. and again as a Colonel during the Gettysburg Campaign. Saw no action.
    David Middlecoff was a private in the war of 1812 and saw action with a PA milita unit from the Gettysburg area in the trenches north of Baltimore after the Battle Middlecoff’s Troop as a Captain during the Antietam Campaign, saw no action that I know of. Does not appear to have been active during Gettysburg (he would have been pushing 70) He was known as General Middlecoff in some family letters, but I have no idea when he held that position.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  29. My GG-Father was Steven Acker. He enlisted in the 67th Inf.(1st Long Island) and went missing May 31st 1862 at the Battle of Fair Oaks. The story that was passed down to me from my Uncle was that he wrote a letter home the night before the battle and said he was being sent on a secret mission. He was never heard from again.
    I do not have THAT letter, but I do have several others from him sent home to my GG Grandmother where he describes life in camp in DC and troops being reviewed by President Lincoln.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  30. My second great grandfather James A Taylor (a.k.a.) Watterson (service form September 17, 1862 – 7 August, 1862) was wounded in the Battle of Antietam, Maryland. While fighting for the union, James was wounded loosing the use of his left arm. While he was cooperating in the hospital, he was visited by President Abraham Lincoln. I have a photograph of James with his metal.
    B 186′ & E 186′ New York Infantry I 10 M 10 & K 10 NY H Arty

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  31. We are pursing a project to find the graves of Civil War Veterans in the United Kingdom. So so far know of some 1,300 Union and 130 Confederate veterans likely to be buried here (and know the locations of about 25% of their graves).
    We (the London Camp of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War) would be very grateful for any information about such and casters and burials from Ancestry users.

  32. I’m related to Richard Rowland Kirkland “Angel of Marye’s Heights”.

  33. You want a comment. The site is very disappointing

  34. I disagree with your project. It was a dirty filthy war that has been glamorized and romanticized beyond reason. Union volunteers of 1861 and 1862 lived like junk yard dogs. They began to waiver by 1863 and found themselves forsaken as the North turned its back on the war. Politicians and the Officer Corps betrayed the Union army at Appomattox and left the black race to swing at the end of a rope for 100 years. Finally, the G.A.R. came to believe that the South was right, after all. So, what is there to celebrate here? Why should these men be remembered?

  35. At FindaGrave.com you can find a virtual cemetery for the 37th Alabama Infantry. Currently over 300 listings and growing daily.

  36. When you get to Mississippi, I will have some stories for you, and names
    with different families and neighbors serving. My great Grandfather, Jefferson Kasey Murley, served in the 32nd Miss. under Mark Perrin Lowery and Patrick Cleburne, under the Hardee Flag. My great Grandfather Sgt. James K. Bartlett, served in the 34th Miss. He was captured by Hookers Men on Nov.24th, 1863, at Lookout Mountain. I wrote a book in 2015 detailing the marches and battles and men of the
    Army of Tennessee from 1862-1865. It is called, “After Bloody Shiloh”

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  37. My maternal great-grandfather, William Henry “PegLeg” Isbell, served in a Regiment of the CSA Army of Northern Virginia. He was wounded at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863 and left on the field for dead. Union troops found him and took him to their field hospital where they amputated one of his legs.
    “PegLeg Isbell was held captive until the war was nearly over. Upon release, he moved to Hanover County, VA and became a cobbler. He was known locally as a jokester who hung out near the Hanover County Courthouse kidding passerby.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  38. Col. James Keith Marshall, grandson of Chief Justice John Marshall, is my 2nd Cousin, 3 times removed. He graduated from VMI in 1860.

    Birth: Apr. 17, 1839 Fauquier County Virginia, USA Death: Jul. 3, 1863 Gettysburg Adams County Pennsylvania.

    Col. James K. Marshall assumed command of Brig. Gen. James J. Pettigrew’s Brigade when Gen. Pettigrewtook command of Heth’s Division on July 3, 1863 at Gettysburg.

    Marshall led the brigade into Pickett’s Charge and fell dead within 50 yards of the Uion lines near the Bryan Barn on Cemetery Ridge. Col. Marshall’s remains probably lie in the Gettysburg Dead Section at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  39. Several on both sides. Just some are great-great-great grandfather, Silas Thomas Baker, from Illinois survived the war and married three times. Great-great-great grandfather, Francis Marion Trucks, from Bibb County, Alabama served in the CSA. Mortally wounded in the head at Sharpsburg and died in the custody of Union soldiers. Probably buried in a mass grave in an unknown location maybe in southern PA. Great-great grandfather, John Wesley Young, served in the Alabama First Cavalry — a Union unit. Died of disease at Decatur, Morgan Co, AL. His widow, my great-great grandmother, Betsy P. Jones Young many years later applied for his pension. Entire file (about 60 pages) at Fold3. Great-great grandfather, James Silas Jernigan, was a boy in Guntersville, Alabama. Says Union soldiers attacked their home killing his parents. He swam across the Tennessee to safety. Possibly a Parrott shell hit their house from a Union gunboat is more likely, but, some Union soldiers did come ashore different times during the war. Who knows what really happened in Guntersville.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  40. My gg grandfather on my Dads side, lived in Dekalb Co. Tn. He fought for the
    Union. My GG grandfather on my on my Moms side ,lived in Boulton Bend, Tn. He and seventeen members of his family enlisted in the Confederate army on the same day. Joel Martin was the Union and Edward B.H. Boulton was the confederate. E.B .H . Boulton was injured with shrapnel in his face and hip when they fought at Lookout mountain. Joel Martin was also injured but I haven’t found out where. Both lived to come home even if Grandpa Joel died in 1891.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  41. Would like to see a search of names so one could see if family names were involved.

  42. I have a family member’s journal from the Civil War, in addition to some other items from other family members. How should we specifically engage?

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  43. My Great grandparents were 1st cousins; their Grandads were brothers and were Privates in Co D, 1st Texas Cavalry, Texas State Troops (aka “Magnolia Rangers). The company mustered in at Galveston, TX on 17JAN1861 before Texas even seceded from the Union. Richard Addison & Needham Anderson Coward were two of 16 family members who were in the unit. The fathers tended to be privates; the boys non-com’s and officers. The drove the Yankees off Galveston Island and out of Ft Brown at Brownsville TX before their unit dissolved after enlistments expired. The younger members tended to join units destined for Texas’ Arizona Brigade headed out west. Others went home to their farms. [I like to say that our family was the largest contingent of Cowards to ever go to war together…LOL!]
    In another story, Needham’s daughter helped sew their unit flag (the largest known based on the First National) and presented it to the Ensign who would care for it…they fell in love at that event but waited until he returned to wed. He was lost in combat and thought to be KIA but was a POW in Camp Douglas. He wouldn’t sign the allegiance papers so he ended up walking home. She got married and a few years later widowed. After months of mourning, her sisters and cousins convinced her to go with them to a big gala in Galveston from their home some 30 miles away (a large distance back in that day). The Ensign, John Henry Kipp, was the host of the party. When he got home from the war, he had lost track of Lucretia and married another lady who subsequently died. The two immediately rekindled their love and married. They founded the city of Kemah, TX where they are buried side by side.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  44. Not directly a soldier story. As a child I was told by an elderly relative that his mother, my great, great grandmother – Johana Cronin Dowd – rocked her first baby in her farm house in Cabin John, Maryland listening to cannon fire. That would have been in 1864. Two of her Irish immigrant brothers were in Union service and her father-in-law (Daniel Dowd), who owned the farm, sold milk to the Union troops in Washington D.C.

  45. My G-G Grandfather, Timothy B Robinson and his younger brother Henry were from Bristol, Ct. They joined in August 1862, serving with the 16th Conn Volunteer Regiment, Company K. The regiment was badly mauled at the battle of Antietam a month later but Tim’s most interesting war story is his escape.

    In April 1864 the entire regiment, then serving garrison duty in Plymouth, NC was besieged, surrounded and captured. Henry was seriously wounded in that fight and was sent to Andersonville prison where he died in August 1864 from wounds and malnutrition. He’s buried in the National Cemetery there.

    Tim was sent to a different prison camp and he escaped by jumping off a boxcar but he was recaptured and sent to Camp Sorghum prison camp in Columbia SC. In November 1864 after 7 months of captivity he escaped a second time with 2 fellow officers.

    The plan was to follow the Congaree and Santee Rivers to the coast, a serpentine distance of about 200 miles. Along the way they discovered and joined up with 5 other POW escapees on the river who had made contact with sympathetic slaves who provided them with 2 small boats and some food. In fact, the group would be helped along the way by other friendly slaves who provided critical information on the whereabouts of Confederates on the rivers.

    As the rivers were guarded at key points they only traveled at night, drifting with the current, sleeping in the swamps by day. Their greatest fear was being seen by white faces. They made it to the mouth of the Santee River in 9 days. They could see the spars of a union gunboat on station about 7 or 8 miles offshore but they were unable to attract its attention. After repeated failed attempts to get the crowded leaky boats thru the surf, one boat succeeded in paddling out to the USS Canadaigua and the entire group was rescued.

    Tim was involved in veteran’s affairs for the rest of his life. He was the last president of the 16th Regiment Veterans Association. When he died in 1918 there was no one else able to serve.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  46. My Great-Grandfather, Richard Collier Price was from Virginia. He was from a large family, including three brothers who fought for the Confederacy. My great-grandfather enlisted in Company C. in 1863,
    January, 28 as a Private and by 1864 he was promoted to Corporal. In 1863 he was wounded in Gettysburg and was taken prisoner. Before he enlisted he was only given a few months to live because he was diagnosed as having Tuberculosis, however, being out in the fresh air must have healed him. After the war he went back to his farm. He then married and raised a family of two sons and twin daughters. He became a widower and raised these children with the help of one of his brothers and his wife. As a single parent living in those difficult times he was able to send the girls and one of his sons to college. My grandfather was the son who did not attend college but stayed on the family farm. I am very proud of my great grandfather who not only went off to war but also had to provide for his family by himself. He died in 1924 and is buried in the church cemetery. I am happy to say that my family still owns the property and I live in the home he was born in.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  47. Stanley Norman Mitchell – B:3 Jan 1843 in Montrose, PA. – D:26 Dec 1908 in Binghamton, NY. Fought in Company B, 162nd Regiment, 17th Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry (1862-1864, Civil War). Promoted to Sergeant Major, August 1, 1864.

    George Wilkins Kendall – B:6 Dec 1845 in Mobile, Alabama – D: 7 Oct 1905 in Binghamton, NY. Enlisted 1864. 1st Lieut., Company K, 8th Alabama Infantry Regiment

    Several of my great grandfather’s fought in the War. I would like to know about them and can contribute photos of each. This is a wonderful service.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  48. Anthony Horace (A.H.) Windsor is an ancestor of mine, who was Chaplain, 91st Infantry Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. This unit served in what is now West Virginia, and then mostly in the Shenandoah Valley from 1862 to the end of the war. I have a copy of his History of the Ninety-First Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry published in 1865, and have requested a copy of Col. Coates’ History of his Company. I have a copy of Blazer’s Scouts, but I am looking for more materials about this Regiment, the towns and counties where they were raised, the Battles in which they fought, and some personal reflections by members or family members. He was buried in Athens, Ohio.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  49. My Great-Grandfather Samuel Spangler of Clark County MO was a captain in the Union Army. I am fortunate to have a collection of letters that he wrote in 1862 to his wife, my Great-Grandmother Mary Ann Spangler, who stayed at their farmhouse in Clark County. One letter refers to the President calling up 600,000 more men. Samuel of course was referring to Lincoln.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  50. You have taken on a monumental task. Nevertheless, it is one of the best that you could possibly do, Thank you so much for this undertaking. I have been weeding through these records for many yeas in my attempts to put a story together about my Civil War ancestors. No doubt, I have missed some or many. Heaven forbid that I have gotten some of them wrong:)

    I look forward to your accomplishments

    Souglas M. Wright