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Introducing Civil War Stories!

Do you have an ancestor that fought in the Civil War? We are beyond excited to launch the first phase of our new Civil War Stories, an ambitious project that ultimately hopes to create a comprehensive list of every soldier that fought in the Civil War, the company and regiment he belonged to, the battles he fought in, and finally what happened to each soldier following the war.

How can we possibly do this? We have created new technology allowing us to gather data from Ancestry®, Fold3®, Newspapers.com™, Find a Grave®, and other sources. Next, we are teaming up with the American Battlefield Trust and their Civil War experts to integrate their amazing collections of stories, videos, and photographs into our new experience. Stitching all of these collections together, we have created the first of its kind searchable database of Civil War soldiers, regiments and battles. The human cost of the Civil War was astounding. The proportion of deaths to the population was greater than any other conflict in American history. Nearly 3% of the population died – roughly comparable to 6-10 million Americans today.

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This was the last war where companies enlisted from home communities. Soldiers were often related to others in the company, and all shared a sense of connection. If a company endured losses in a battle, there was a dramatic impact back in their hometown. This will also help tell the story of the families left behind. We want to help you paint a picture of how the Civil War impacted your family tree!

How will this rollout? We will begin with the major Civil War battles. Starting today, you can head to our Civil War Stories page and learn details about some of the major Civil War battles, including what regiments fought in each battle.

And then starting with North Carolina Regiments, you will be able to see regiment timelines. When did they muster in? Where did they fight? Who were the officers? Eventually, we will add the ability to refine down to company. By the time this project is complete, you’ll be able to map out your soldier’s movements throughout the war.

Finally, we’ll add individual soldiers state by state beginning with North Carolina, followed by New York. We realize that you may know details about your Civil War soldier that nobody else does. Do you have family records, photographs or journals that have been passed down? We’re going to provide a way for you to contribute to this Civil War Stories collection. Maybe your journal mentions other soldiers in the same company. Now their ancestors will be able to share your data. 

You can see why we’re so excited about Civil War Stories. Watch for updates throughout the year. If you would like to contribute any research/photographs/letters to be included in this project, visit https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! To learn more about this, head to our Civil War Stories page today!

469 Comments

  1. I have several ancestors who were in the Civil War. One, Phillip Beamer Williams, a 30 year old native of VA served with the Union forces and left 20 letters to his wife in northern MO. He literally walked from there too Vicksburg, to a rice field in GA, to NC, to he Grand Review in Washington, DC. I would be glad to share those letters which show the couples 3 year separation. They were both American heroes in my book.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  2. My great grandfather, Charles Taylor Howell, enlisted in Co C, 39th Mississippi, along with his 3 brothers-Issac E,, Thomas Jefferson, and William. William died at Corinth, and the remaining 3 were all severely wounded-loss of hands, legs, etc. at Corinth, Pine Mountain, Jackson, Resaca, Port Hudson, etc. After the war my ggrandfather came to Texas in 1868, became a tenant farmer (share cropper)and died in 1917. TJ was on crutches the rest of his life and died a pauper in Mississippi about 1912. Issac E, lived in Jackson Ms as a share cropper after the war but moved to Texas in early 1900s (to live with son) and died in Kaufman County, Texas in 1911. All of them, prior to Civil War, were farming next to each other and scratching out a living in Scott County, Mississippi. They, like 95% of Confederates, owned no slaves. They lost everything and were penniless when they died. In my own case, my grandfather was a share cropper. 2 points to be made-the more accurate 300,000 killed in Confederacy was at least 30% of enlistments. Add in at least another 300,000 wounded and you get 60-70% of total enlisted. The total number of whites in South was no more than 5 million. There was no family not touched by a death or dismemberment—-a staggering number. Second point-it took at least 2, perhaps 3 generations for those in the South to gain some level of prosperity. The Civil War was the single most destructive event in American history. It took more than 100 years before the South ever began to recover.

    • I completely agree with your information, Gary. My family was not wealthy but held land and held their own up to the American Civil War. They had no slaves and the father of the house left behind nine children, the youngest of which was my great-grandfather. It took three generations for the Barnard family on my side to own land again and that land was bought with money that my dad sent home while he was serving in World War II. The Civil War was in truth the single most destructive even in American history as you say. I’ve seen it in my own family. I hope if anyone thinks that we should have another one at some time (as divided as our country is now), they learn the history of what happened in the wake of that first one. Thanks for your valuable information.

    • Reply to Mr. Gary Howell post. My Great Grandfather, Richard Albert Barry Craig, served in the 22nd Mississippi Infantry, and participated in many of the Civil War battles which you listed. He was captured by Union forces at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee in 1864 and transported to the infamous Union prison of Camp Douglas in Chicago, and there survived the Winter of 1864-65 despite the implementation of the “starvation diet” mandated by President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton meant to insure that any Southern prisoners “exchanged” for Union counterparts would be rendered physically “unfit” for combat. Post-Appomattox, the prisoners were transported to Cairo, Il. and sent South via steamboat down the Mississippi. He was able to find enough work at ports en route that on arrival in Memphis he was able to travel back to Mississippi by Railway. On his return home, he found that most of the family property had been “appropriated” by the “victors”, and with a Cousin embarked for Texas in hopes of joining Gen. Jo Shelby and other Confederate “ex-pats” in a “volunteer”
      group intended to support Emperor Maximillian in Mexico. On arrival in San Antonio, they discovered that they had missed that “opportunity”, and decided to join separate Cattle Drives en route to Kansas. After two years with the Cattle Drives, he purchased land in Hunt County, Texas ( very near Kaufmann County ), and began his own modest Cattle operation, which was continued by my Grandfather, in addition to his other business interests. I am in possession of a letter which my Great Grandfather sent “from our works before Atlanta”, describing the Battle of Resaca and listing the fates of family, friends and neighbors from the home County in Mississippi in that battle. I also have three letters written to my then “pre-teen” father, describing his military experiences and conditions in the Camp Douglas Prison Camp, as well as letters written home “wintering over” in Kansas during the Cattle Drives from Texas.

    • Very sad! Unfortunately the politically powerful in the South made a terrible decision to secede, and lead their people to ruin.

    • Mr. Howell , you are correct in stating most Confederate soldiers had no slaves. Most fought not to save slavery but against what they viewed as meddling Northern politicians. Much of today’s youth (my 50-something sons included) compare the Confederate flag with the swastika. To me, Hitler sold the German population a bill of goods simply because he could. In some ways we in the South were not far different than the citizens of the countries Hitler over ran. Is it shameful to defend your homeland from interlopers and carpetbaggers?

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  3. I too, like many people know of ancestors who fought in the civil war. I am in possession of letters written home by my ancestors. They are quite interesting. As with many wars, the men wrote that they were cold, hungry, and not being paid on time, among other subjects.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  4. I donated an entire packet of Civil War letters from a Civil War soldier to his family in Massachusetts. He died of his wounds but the letters described battles. They are in the possession of the Concord Mass Library Archives.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  5. I am thrilled about this exciting feature and know a couple of people who will be as well. I think my only concern – and it’s a big one – is the use of Find a Grave. Most of us know it as an unreliable source so I hope the information obtained from there is vetted and cited appropriately. Thank you!

    • I completely agree concerning Findagrave info. I know firsthand of misinformation included there, and also hope strongly that the info will be vetted to the nth degree, if it’s to be included.

    • Corrections can be made on findagrave. You just need to take the effort to do it and you can add source information. This will go far to make this a reliable source.

    • I found my grandfather through find a grave. I found out he did not have a head ‘stone. I was able to not only find the cemetery but also the grave. The only marker was a small cement foot (stone) . I was able, with the cemeterit’s help order a headstone and paid $100 to have it set in place. My son, daughter in law and I were able watch this in person. I have also found other deceased family using find a grave.

  6. Antique Roadshow has so many Civil War stories, pictures, letters, diaries, and artifacts. It would be a great source for you of human interest stories from the descendants.

  7. Will you also be collecting information on soldiers who served elsewhere during the War? My ggrandfather & his brother enlisted in a Kansas unit and served for most of 3 years escorting military supply trains along the Santa Fe Trail from Ft Leavenworth to various forts in New Mexico.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  8. My grandfather was a USAFE veteran as they told us but unfortunately he got no pension from USA.
    I heard from my family that someone processed it but failed because of the birthcertificate
    US record has different spelling to his middle name
    My grandfather’s name
    BONIFACIO YAP PALANCA
    My other cousins spelled (Plangca /planca)
    I have here his big spoon with a hole in the handle he told me this is from USA
    He got this antique box / Truhe / Cavan
    He once told me this was also from USA when he fought against the Japanese war here in the Philippines
    I still have them on my house because I love antiques
    My grandfather last residence was in escalante negros Occidental
    He was tall big built
    I hope someone from this organization could help us locate his name on the list so that our descendants
    may also avail the benefits that my grandfather supposed to avail
    He died at age 68 of heart attacked in Manila medical center
    I can secure birthcertificate of my grandfather
    I have here with me the death and birthcertificate of her younger sister
    I can send you picture of the old big spoon with the hole on the handle and this antique Truhe / box
    The last letter from USA my brother had seen it he told me just now was
    A letter that USA has been asking of onother document that can prove of my grandfathers name because there was a mistake on the middle name instead of Y ( yap )
    The USA office wrote it Z
    but after that no correspondence anymore coz the one who follow up or process these documents died as I heard it I really don’t know what had happened but since I am connected with you and so I took this opportunity to ask and write to you hoping I can get an answer
    My grandparents had 13 children and only 2 are left now
    The family name of my grandfather
    Planca or palanca im using palanca
    My cousins use Plangca wrongly misspelled
    My email address
    [email protected]
    Contact number 0063-34-4315226
    Cell # 0063 -9397200011
    I’m cynthia Palanca Sy
    Thank you for reading my story

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  9. Ephrain Smith, my 3rd Great Grandfather, was a member of Iowa 37th Infantry Co. K known as the “Greybeards”. It was a Union regiment of older men ranging from 45 to 80 years old. Ephrain joined when he was 62 years old. The idea being younger men seeing the old soldiers marching to war would be filled with shame and scurry off to the recruiter. Members did not engage in combat but guarded arsenals, military trains and prisons. Four of his sons, George, Rufus, Merrit and Leonard also served. After two years of service an injury caused him t leave the unit. While sleeping in a lower bunk the bed above came crashing down on him breaking his leg. He used a cane the rest of his life.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  10. My Gr-gr-grandfather Richard W. Cole had 2 sons and 2 son-in-laws enlist in Mississippi regiments. He finally enlisted in summer of ‘63 in the 5th Mississippi Cavalry. This unit fought under Gen. Chalmers and Gen. Forrest. He was killed in action at the infamous Battle of Fort Pillow, 12 April 1864.
    I have researched and collected records of 100 Confederate casualties(KIA & WIA) and 580 Union & civilians who were casualties or PWs. Despite the “stories”, the Union suffered 34% casualties. The 5th Miss Cavalry Regiment had the highest number of casualties, including their commander who was mortally wounded.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  11. Two of my great-grandfathers fought together in the same infantry and company. William Funk is my maternal great-grandfather. He was from Butler township, Adams County, Pennsylvania. Abraham Herring is my paternal great-grandfather. He was from Liberty or Freedom Township, Adams County. They both fought in the 184th Infantry, Co. K. They were inducted in Sept., 1864, supposedly for 1 year. They were in Petersburg, Hatcher’s Run, Fort Haskell and Steadman, ending up at Appomattox Court House when the Rebel Army surrendered. William was mustered out June 2, 1865. Abraham in Aug., 1865.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  12. I’m writing a book about all the veterans of Yadkin County, N.C. (Using ancestry and fold3 to verify). At this time I have over 1300 confederate and over 100 union. The tools Fold3 have helped quite a bit and I love that they continue to add more all the time.

    • I have several relatives that lived in Yadkin Co and am very interested in your book progress.

    • Thank you Edward. Since you are writing a book you may not want to share your research. If you would like to however, we’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link or email me at [email protected] to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  13. My Great grandfather Archie H. Aisquith !845-1894 enlisted at the age of 17 and who loss his right arm in the battle of Chancellorsville, VA. He was in Co. G 2nd VA infantry, Stonewell Brigade. He was rendered unfit for service, but not withstanding his maimed condition, unwilling to quit the service and give up the struggle, he became a volunteer in Co. B 12th VA cavalry, and was with that company in many of its engagements in the campaign of 1864-1865. After the war, he and his brother opened a drug store business in Charles Town.. He later retried and died on his farm in Montgomery county MD, where he had and raised 10 children, His wife Mary Rutherford Aisquith died in Washington, DC in 1939.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  14. I am proud to say that I had one Great Grandfather, Gabriel Holder and his three brothers, third Great Uncles, Jesse, John and William. They were all in the following Tennessee Union units: Gabriel – 3rd Reg. Inf. Co. H, Jesse – 4th Cal. Reg. Co. E, John – 1st Reg. Inf. Co. G, William – 3rd Reg. Inf. Co. H. All survived the war and lived long ang healty lives.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  15. My Barnard ancestors served in the Kentucky 9th Confederacy also known as the Orphan Brigade, because they fought for the confederacy even though Kentucky was neutral. Father and Son joined up. Father, who was named William Logan Barnard II, died at Shiloh on April 6th, 1862. The family always said he drowned but however he died it was in battle. He was named after William Logan Barnard who fought in the revolution of America from Britain so one member fought to free America and another to tear America in two. The son of William Logan II went on to fight throughout the Civil War and went to Texas at the end to live out his life. He had signed the oath to America but always thought of himself as Confederate. His name is Ignatius Barnard, also called Nace. I wrote a book about all this, available on Amazon.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  16. My Deatrick ancestors fought for the north in the civil war. I have several letters written home and back to battle during the war and have reproduced them in my book: “Mein Name Ist Peter Dietrich”. The Deatricks had people fighting on either side.

    • After reading your comment I found your book on Amazon, and read the forward and a few pages… I shall certainly read the rest. It appears to be well written and concise. And who knew I would find an interesting book and author on Fold3!

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  17. My 2nd great-grandfather was Levi Snapp. He enlisted in the 5th VA Volunteers (infantry) Co K and his father, Bennett Snapp and brother James Snapp both enlisted in the 33rd VA Infantry, Co D.

    I have found some information about Levi’s company including a photo and know that he was injured and captured at the Battle of Falling Waters but little else. And sadly, there is no family history.

    Does anyone know of them or their companies?
    Hopefully Fold 3 will be able to provide more information’

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  18. What will you be able to do about soldiers who fought under assumed names? Soldiers in the border states sometimes used assumed names so that their families were not subject to reprisals by their neighbors.
    My ancestor was born in (what would become) WV, and was a southern sympathizer. He could not openly declare so in a town that mostly supported the north. We know he fought for the south, but believe him to have used an assumed name to protect his family back in WV.
    Do you know any way to make a link between his real WV name and his assumed name during the war years? Using only his real name, I have not been able to establish a link.
    I applaud your goal, and believe those men deserve the effort it will take to make it happen. I hope one day we could extend your concept to include every person who ever fought for our country throughout our history.

    • Carson O. Hudson, Jr., in his “Hidden History of Civil War Williamsburgs”, relates the story of Sarah Emma Edmonds, born in New Brunswick, Canada, in 1841. In escaping an arranged marriage, she found herself in Michigan when the war broke out. She cut her hair, assumed the name Franklin Thompson, and enlisted in the Flint Union Greys, which became Company F of the Second Michigan Infantry. Apparently, military physicals weren’t what they are today. During her time in the Union Army she posed as a male nurse and spy (in both male and female garb). In 1897, she was even accepted into the Union veteran’s organization, the Grand Army of the Republic

    • That’s a good question! I would think we could add both the assumed name and the real name. I’ll pass that along to our development team to assess.

  19. Without doing an exhaustive search I have identified 19 men in my family tree who fought in the Civil War, including a 3GGrandfather, two 2GGrandfathers, and two Great Grandfathers. My maternal grandparents’ fathers, Jasper Newton Thompson from Virginia and Stephen Adams from Kentucky, fought on opposite sides; and my 3GGrandfather, William Bruce Lykins, enlisted in October 1861 along with his three oldest sons, including my 2GGrandfather, David Jesse Lykins. A fourth son enlisted in January 1862, and the two youngest sons enlisted in October 1862. All seven served in the 5th Kentucky Infantry (CSA). William Bruce and three of his sons mustered out in October 1862. David Jesse was captured in December 1862; sent to prison in Alton, Illinois; and paroled in January 1863. The last two sons were both wounded at Jonesborough, Georgia, in September 1864 but recovered and survived the war.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  20. I have four Civil War great great grandfathers- two of whom died in battle. I have much info from my aunt, who collected info for a book about Terry’s Texas Rangers- the 8th Texas Cavalry- of which two of my gr great grandfathers were members The other Confederate gr great grandfather fought at Galveston and came home to his family and his farm..

    I also have family info on the one Union soldier – my gr great grandfather from Pennsylvania, who died at Chancellorsville.

  21. My Great Great Uncle, Pvt. James Cookman, born in Quebec, left home at age 26 and enlisted in Charleston, Vermont in Co D, 3rd Vermont Volunteer Infantry and was mustered in in June 1861. He was involved in fighting during the Peninsula Campaign under Gen. William F. “Baldy” Smith’s command and was killed in action at the Battle of Dam Number 1 (aka Lee’s Mills) on 16 April 1862. He was identified and is buried in the Yorktown National Cemetery in Plot 596. Many have called this battle “A Dam Failure”.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  22. My Great Grandfather fought in the Civil War. He was with the 91si Pennsylvania Infantry. He fought in the Wilderness Campaign. He was discharged in the field at Appomattox. He had a small pension from the government after. Many years ago I sent proof of relationship to Washington and got some of his papers. It was really interesting and I was so happy I did that because It became more real, not just family talk. I even got his papers from his enlistment. His name was Edwin Hoffman Dyke.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  23. My great grandfather, Hiram E. Benedict enlisted in the Navy August 26, 1864, at Buffalo, N.Y. as a landsman and served on the Michigan, North Carolina, and Belle. The Belle was employed in the North Carolina Sounds area and took part in the capture of Plymouth, N.C. on 31 October 1864.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  24. To date, I have found 43 of my relatives who fought in the Civil War (all for the Confederacy) 10 of which died during the war of wounds or disease. There are two of these that have really haunted me as to what happened to them. One, Lindsay Bernease Hall (21, with the 3rd Texas Cavalry) was wounded at the Battle of Iuka, Mississippi, left with the other wounded and captured by the Federals. He was never heard from again – what happened to him? Another was John Franklin Allday (46th Mississippi Infantry). He was captured at Vicksburg in 1863, paroled, rejoined his unit later, records show he was issued clothing in March of 1864, but died in 1864 in Alexandria, Louisiana – when, how? I don’t think his unit was ever in Louisiana.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  25. My great great grandfather, Van Ranzler Morgan, fought for the confederacy in 2nd Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry (Duke’s), Company B. He enlisted in Shepardsville, KY in 1862. He was a prisoner of war several times, captured by the Cumberland River. He deserted in June of 1864. He made his way back home to his wife, Mary Ann Hart, and children in Anderson County, KY. They had 3 more children for a total of 6. In 1870, he was counted in the census in Eureka, NV as a freighter along with his father Daniel Morgan. He is said to have deserted his wife and children as an attorney was named guardian for his minor children in the 1870s. We have no information on where or when he died or where he is buried. I visited Eureka, NV a year ago to see what they might have on him and was not able to find any info and he’s not in any of their cemeteries. As a freighter, he could have fallen off his horse and died along the trail, for all we know. As you may know, there is no pension information for deserters!

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  26. My Great Grand Father William H. Williams was at Pea Ridge,AR. I went there and asked for them to look him up. They had 3 men listed with the same names..same H. initial. My Great Grand Father was William Humphrey Williams, His wife was Rebecca E. Wardlaw Williams. In 1880 and 1882 he had a boy and a girl. The girl was my Grandmother I have a picture of his retired unit. But I have no information about what unit is was except I think Infantry. There was a man by the last name of Thomason in that picture, he is also one of my Relatives. Would anyone else be looking for information about this group?

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  27. What are you going to do with the existing Ancestry sponsored Civil War Websites, specifically the roots-web pages. I spent days imputing into these databases complete with biographies, pictures, stories and letters from the combatants. I see no reason to do it again.

  28. I know of about 12, including all four great-grandfathers, who fought for the Confederate States of America. At least two were killed, At least four were taken prisoner. At least seven were wounded. Moist were privates, at least to start with. There were two Lieutenants, one Captain, and one Colonel at the end. I have biographies of all but two or three, ranging from a paragraph to several pages, plus one of 101 pages, all of which I wrote. All were in Tennessee units, except two in Arkansas units.

    Do you want me to send them to you?

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  29. I like where you are headed with this project. The Civil War really was a family story and impacted many lives in this country. I had a wonderful professor at Virginia Tech that taught his Civil War class from the perspective of the soldier and his family through letters that were sent during this time. Dr. Robertson, unfortunately, died last year, but he left a wonderful legacy through the impact that he made on students and the American community. Good luck with this project and I look forward to seeing how we family historians can contribute before all of our family lore is lost.

    • Dr. Robertson wrote a great biography on Stonewall Jackson. He also appeared in the Civil War Journal Series.

  30. I have information on William Coleman Franklin, who enlisted in Arkansas.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  31. We have transcripts of over 125 letters written home by my gr-grandfather, his 4 brothers & other family members. His name is spelled oddly on his service record and an uncle is said to have died in a battle 2 years before the boy’s letter home telling about being with him at his death. Correcting such errors, adding their stories & pictures in uniform of 2 of the brothers will be a blessing.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  32. I have been attempting to find where my cousin was buried when he died on September 18, 1864 in a battle with the 14th and 15th Pennsylvania Calvary.

    His name was Oscar Cheesman Smith. He was born in Manhassett, New York in 1838. His mother was a sister to my Great Great Grandfather, who also was born in 1838, in New York. They grew up together and were great friends. Sheridan and “OC” went to school together and were separated only when Sheridan’s family moved to to be closer to New York, and eventually ended up living in Brooklyn, NY.

    OC sometime later moved to Wetimonga, Alabama, to strike out on his own. I believe he must have read in a newspaper that Samuel House was hiring young men to work with a hardware distribution company located in Weimunga, Alabama, and in 1858 somehow, found his way there and in the employment of Samuel House. In the 1860 US Census, he was living with four other young men in a house owned by Samuel House and working as “clerks” for the hardware distributor.

    The last word the family heard of OC Smith must have been in the form of a letter in which he passed on that everything was great in Alabama and he was in love with a lady which he intended to Marry soon. That letter was received in 1860 in New York.

    My Information of a letter from OC is taken from a written history of the Poole family which was hired by one of Sheridan Poole’s sons, Harold Sheridan Poole, in 1945. Nobody ever learned what had happened to OC until I started to dig into his life in Alabama at the time of the start of the Civil War.

    It was easy to find records that in March of 1860, an Oscar Cheesman Smith enlisted into the 3rd Alabama Infintry, as a Supply Sargent and sent off to learn how to be a confederate solder. In December of 1860 the 3rd Alabama turned up guarding the Naval station captured by the South in Norfolk, VA. The duty there was easy being in Virginia and not having to repel any Northern attack on the Port.

    After that winter the 3rd Alabama was sent up to Richmond to help reinforce the defenders in the area. They were not at the first big land battle of the Civil War which was Bull Run (North’s name of the battle) or Mannass (South’s name of the battle).

    The 3rd Alabama made a name for itself in Summer of 1862 in the defence of Richmond. After that they were sent to the Stonewall Brigade where they fought at Chanclersburg, Antitum, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, where OC was wounded, (grapeshot) Wilderness, (he was back in the action), he fought into the night on the fight where they found themselves five miles from the White House and were ordered to stop, to find themselves strongly opposed in the morning, they retreated.

    Lt. O. C. Smith was killed on September 18, 1864 in a battle with Sheridan’s first Calvary, where he was shot in the neck and officially dead. The name given to the battle was Stonebridge (by the North).

    The reason for OC to fight for the South became evident when I learned that the girl he loved gave birth to a boy in March of 1861. (In the US Census of 1870, his girlfriend was found in Montgomery, no child was listed. In the 1880 US Census she listed a 19 year old boy as her son.)

    I am still attempting to find where his body was buried, but the controversy of where he was killed still lingers. There is still a lot to be learned why Gen. Sheridan moved swiftly to attack the South in the Third Battle of Winchester and push the Confederates out of the Valley and back to Tennessee so decisively. I believe The Battle of Stonebridge is part of that story.

    I also believe Lt. O.C. Smith is part of that story, and his grave is possibly in the Martinsburg, Municipal Cemetary, two miles where I believe the battle was fought. There is a mass Confederate gravesite with 28 unknown Confederates lie buried.

    “Love has no bounds”

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  33. Private William Jasper REED and younger brother Andrew (Andy) Jackson Reed served entire war. Jasper Reed was wounded in one thigh, leaving him crippled for life. He and his brother Andy Reed
    survived Gettysburg, PA. Jasper Reed, my ancestor, came from Tennessee into Georgia. His and Andy Reed’s father was Joseph Reed, their mother was Elvira Perkins, daughter of John Perkins of TN and GA. Jasper became a lumberman, the business continued by Reed descendants until 2017 when the last Reed lumber mill owner died of lung cancer. Jimmy Reed, the last lumberman, lived Murray County, Georgia.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  34. I am definitely interested in contributing our family’s CW stories.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  35. My ggg grandfather and 3 of his brothers were part of the 64th Virginia mounted infantry that were captured at Cumberland Gap in September of 1863. The 3 brothers spent the duration of the war at Camp Douglas in Chicago. Somehow , my ggg grandfather escaped after being captured. I’m always searching for more information.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  36. I am very interested in UNION REGIMENTS from Delaware, also from Virginia

    Isaac J LORT, CAPTAIN 1818 1862//Joseph LORT, CAPTAIN 1784-1850
    BURBEGE BROCK ,MR//1798-1885

  37. A mistake above is Andrew Jackson Reed was the elder brother of William Jasper Reed. I apologize for the mistake. Andy Reed left Georgia with his family sometime after the War. One daughter, called “Shug” (pronounced like sug ar) remained, married to a Long gentleman. They lived in Whitfield County, created 1833 from Murray Co., created 1832. Later members of the Long family lived in Murray Co. The census will prove helpful. I’ve worked on a straight line to William JASPER (also called “Jap”) REED, whose daughter, Johnnie Olivia Reed married Jasper PARKER Anderson in Murray Co; Parker was the first child and son of James (Jim) Hollinshead Anderson and Margaret Logan. (The Joseph Reed family was found 1850 on the Polk Co TN census. A neighbor there was Benjamin Curd, who moved to Murray County apparently when Joseph moved there and lived adjacent. Curd was killed in the Confederate Army. His descendants sued the estate of Joseph Reed. The reason for the court suit hasn’t been resolved by the writer. A Curd descendant, Charles Chaney, has published, probably online, Reed family genealogy. I’ve failed to obtain a copy of the Chaney material. Mr. Chaney’s genealogy may include any Curd family connection to Joseph Reed and Elvira Perkins. It appears on the census Curd children resided with Joseph Reed and Elvira Perkins after the death of their Curd father. The writer does not have data regarding Benjamin Curd’s wife’s name or family.)

  38. Had people on both sides of the war not sure of all the names. I know that my Horn’s fought on Both sides and the Northern side changed their name to Horne after the war. My Murrays did the same thing they dropped the
    a their name.

    I have in my collection all but 2 (loan and never returned)
    of the Time Life series of the Civil War 20+ volumns. Cival War in Virginia by Chester G Hern and Staff Officers in Gray by Robert E. L. Krick. It is a Biographical Register of the Staff Officers in the Army of Northern Virginia. Unfortunately it doesn”t have their pictures in the book.

  39. SHARON ANN DEAN

    Heny C.Dean….William Acker……John E. Roberts

    My great grandfather, Henry C. Dean, enlisted from New York. He was wounded and received a pension. My step great grandfather, William Acker, enlisted from N.Y. also, and he was wounded at the Battle of Ashby’ s Gap, Va. and survived . He joined up from the Lima/Conesus area of N.Y.

    My most interesting story is that of Cpl/Sgt John E. Roberts whose diary l was privileged to inherit. He joined the Wadsworth Guards, 104th infantry from Geneseo, N.Y. l am currently transcribing this beautiful young man’s tale. John was injured on the the second day at Gettysburg and died two weeks later. Among his stories is one about how he and his men were captured by the Rebels but cleverly outfoxed them and escaped. Please contact me if you have information to share about any of these men an l will do [email protected]

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  40. I have a few civil war ancestors, one was Durrett Morris who was a tailor and made uniforms for the confederate army, he fought with Conrad’s in Virginia

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  41. I have already done this for the 44th Missouri Voluntary Infantry. Please refer to one of my family trees on Ancestry.com to access my research (over 30 years worth). The tree is called “44th MO Vol Infantry.” My research first started with simply attempting to locate the graves of all of the soldiers of this regiment, of which I did with the exception of about 100 men. I built the family tree so that ancestors of these men could discover what their relatives did during the Civil War.

  42. I am Canadian but my 3rd gr. grandfather Thomas Hardesty of the Penn. volunteers enlisted in 1861as a private then a lieutenent then a colonel and was discharged in 1865.
    My 3 gr aunt Mary Entler known as Rebel Mary was a confederate spy from West Virginia and there were a number of Entlers who fought for the south.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  43. A diary (friendship tablet) was left on a table in a house where both North and South planned battles associated with the Chattanooga Campaign and the Atlanta campaign. I wrote a book, The Friendship Tablet I recently published on Amazon. You can get it for a very nominal price. It is both a biography of A I Leet, a Methodist preacher who impacted the lives of many, many families in North Georgia in the 19th century, centered on the Civil War period, and a commentary of common life during that time.

  44. I am presently compiling 40+ yrs of research into one of my family lines: COMPTONS. I am including information I found in Footnotes and in Fold3.

    My gt grandfather’s brother, Stephen R. Compton served from MS in the Civil War. I inherited a letter he wrote Aug.6th,1861 after the 1st battle of Mannasas. It is several pages long and a heart-rending epistle. If you are interested I can send you the transcription and a copy of the original letter.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  45. I had several Great Grandfathers in the Civil War. One of them was Wallace Webb. He lied about his age so he could enlist, and he fought the last year of the War. He was shot through his right knee and lost 2.5” when it healed. He was at Appomattox when the surrender was given by General Lee.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  46. My Great-Grandfather, John Henry Weeks, not only fought in the Civil War, but as a corporal in the Union Army was awarded a Congressional Medal, which I possess, during the Wilderness Campaign at Spottsylvania and was wounded at Petersburg. He joined the Union Army with volunteers from the Cooperstown, New York area after losing several relatives in the Civil War , one of whom died in a Confederate Prison.

    • My grandfather , Patrick Ryan, also fought in Spottslvania. He was in Appomattox at the end of the war and discharged in Richmond. He was very young 15 or 16. I am fortunate to have this information from his pension papers. Mary

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  47. A great program. I would be pleased to contribute the story of Capt. Sheldon James Grant, of East Windsor, Connecticut, Company Commander of Company C, 99th Colored Infantry. He took a miniball to the head, in one of the last battles of the war, Natural Bridge, Florida. Loaded on the “dead wagon”, he awakened, slid off the wagon, declaring “Did we win the day ?”.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  48. My great grandmother was Mary Luella Sandoe. Her father was John Sandoe. Her Uncle was George Washington Sandoe purported to be the first union soldier killed at the Battle of Gettysburg. We have visited the monument which is erected at the site of his death just below the Visitors Center.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  49. Frederick George Niems (Niams), born in Germany, alias George F. Niems, Private Co. G 7th Regt. Conn Vol. Inf. Sept 7 1861, musician, mustered out July 1865 in Wallingford, Connecticut. Wounded during conflict, and survived.
    Frederick George Niems, alias in Mississippi, Frank G. Henderson, Married the daughter of Confederate Soldier, William Culpepper Hurst, Lavinia Hurst on 11 Oct 1877 • Liberty, Amite County, Mississippi.
    Frederick was a jeweler and they moved following the mining industry.
    They had 7 children born in Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, Nebraska, and New Mexico. The 6th child was my grandfather, William Joseph Niems.
    I have Frederick’s discharge papers, VA Records, and picture of him.
    Frederick is buried at the National Veteran’s Cemetery in Los Angeles, California.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  50. My Grandmother, Alice West Savage (1863 – 1955) had 2 half brothers in the Civil War. Ambrose West (1834 – 1884) served in Company D, Mich.8th Cavalry Regiment. H was a blacksmith.
    Jerome C. West (1827 – 1872) registered in New York. Kirkwood, New York.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo