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Introducing Civil War Stories!

Do you have an ancestor that fought in the Civil War? We are beyond excited to launch the first phase of our new Civil War Stories, an ambitious project that ultimately hopes to create a comprehensive list of every soldier that fought in the Civil War, the company and regiment he belonged to, the battles he fought in, and finally what happened to each soldier following the war.

How can we possibly do this? We have created new technology allowing us to gather data from Ancestry®, Fold3®, Newspapers.com™, Find a Grave®, and other sources. Next, we are teaming up with the American Battlefield Trust and their Civil War experts to integrate their amazing collections of stories, videos, and photographs into our new experience. Stitching all of these collections together, we have created the first of its kind searchable database of Civil War soldiers, regiments and battles. The human cost of the Civil War was astounding. The proportion of deaths to the population was greater than any other conflict in American history. Nearly 3% of the population died – roughly comparable to 6-10 million Americans today.

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This was the last war where companies enlisted from home communities. Soldiers were often related to others in the company, and all shared a sense of connection. If a company endured losses in a battle, there was a dramatic impact back in their hometown. This will also help tell the story of the families left behind. We want to help you paint a picture of how the Civil War impacted your family tree!

How will this rollout? We will begin with the major Civil War battles. Starting today, you can head to our Civil War Stories page and learn details about some of the major Civil War battles, including what regiments fought in each battle.

And then starting with North Carolina Regiments, you will be able to see regiment timelines. When did they muster in? Where did they fight? Who were the officers? Eventually, we will add the ability to refine down to company. By the time this project is complete, you’ll be able to map out your soldier’s movements throughout the war.

Finally, we’ll add individual soldiers state by state beginning with North Carolina, followed by New York. We realize that you may know details about your Civil War soldier that nobody else does. Do you have family records, photographs or journals that have been passed down? We’re going to provide a way for you to contribute to this Civil War Stories collection. Maybe your journal mentions other soldiers in the same company. Now their ancestors will be able to share your data. 

You can see why we’re so excited about Civil War Stories. Watch for updates throughout the year. If you would like to contribute any research/photographs/letters to be included in this project, visit https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! To learn more about this, head to our Civil War Stories page today!

469 Comments

  1. This Civil War story is still being researched.

    My second great grandfather was Augustus Thompson who was a Second Lieutenant in the 8th Regiment North Carolina Militia. There is documentation that Augustus would participate in raids on farms looking for Union soldiers or draft dodgers. In the book “Divided Allegiances” by Gerald W Thomas it was documented that Augustus participated in raids on “the Reddick place”. Note that Augustus was married to Nancy Williams.

    Augustus had a brother named Reddick that joined the Union Company E 2nd North Carolina Infantry in Plymouth, NC. Reddick was married to Martha Williams, Nancy Williams sister, and they had a young daughter named Sallie. All three were in the 1860 census. In 1870 Sallie was living with her grandfather Bennet Thompson but there was no trace of her father and mother, Reddick and Martha.

    A lady contacted me seeking help in identifying a Richard Thompson from Bertie County that served in the Civil War. I did not know of one and could not find one in records. She had an interesting document. Her husband’s ancestor, William Palmer, served in Company K 69th Regiment New York Volunteers. In documenting his service he wrote that an important event was accompanying his mother, Sophorina Thompson Palmer, to the Libby Hill Prison looking for the grave of her brother Richard Thompson who had been tortured and starved to death for refusing to join the Confederate Army. Still, I did not know of a Richard Thompson and at the time I had no record of Sophorina.

    Continuing to research, we found an application for a pension as an orphan of the Civil War as filed by Sallie Thompson. She documented her mother Martha Thompson and her father James R Thompson of Company E 2nd North Carolina Infantry. We had found both Riddick and Richard Thompson; they were one in the same.

    Augustus Thompson and his brother Riddick fought against each other in the Battle of Plymouth. Riddick was captured and sent to the Castle Thunder Prison where records document that he died of pneumonia.

    But Sallie’s documentation provided more information and a little bit of a mystery. Recall that Augustus Thompson was known to raid farms looking for Union solders and one documented farm was “the Reddick place”. It is suspected that the Reddick place was actually the farm of his brother Riddick Thompson. And there was more. Sallie documented that her mother Martha died on December 21, 1864. Two days later on December 23, her father Reddick died in prison.

    One has to wonder if Augustus Thompson had a role in the deaths of his sister-in-law Martha and/or his brother Reddick.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  2. What a powerful narrative of the division the Civil War created. And how fortunate that you and the lady who contacted you were able to work out that Riddick/Richard were the same person.

  3. My great grandfather Dudley Beasley was a Union soldier. He was captured and spent time in the Andersonville Prison camp.

    • My great great grandmothers brother Samuel S Wales 2nd Indiana Cav. also captured and survived Andersonville.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  4. My great great grandfather. William Riley, fighting with the Confederate States Army from North Carolina, was killed in action at Gettysburg.

  5. My great grandfather Ransom Warren, of Halifax County, enlisted on 17 March 1862 in the Company E (Brooklyn Browns), 23rd Regiment , Virginia Infantry for a period of 3 years. He was wounded and captured on 17 September during the battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam). On 15 October he is admitted to US Army Hospital #2 in Fredrick, Maryland for Vulnus Sclopeticum (Latin for infection because of bullet wound) his right arm was amputated there. A few days latter he shows up on a roll of Confederate prisoners in Fort McHenry in Baltimore. He was then shipped to Fort Monroe, near Norfolk Virginia and then paroled. A few days late he shows up in Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond, Va. One of the best hospitals of the war both north and south. A few weeks later he was discharged from the Army and given $128.30 mustering out pay. How he got back to southern Virginia is a mystery. He was exempted from further service. My Dad’s family bible had contained the Surgeon’s Exemption Certificate dated January 1863 citing the loss of right arm as the reasoning. All the rest of the information comes from the National Archives in Atlanta

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  6. My 2nd great uncle Samuel Ranier was killed on July 3, 1963 in the battle of Gettysburg.

  7. My ancestor, William M. Pangburn. a Union soldier enlisted in New Albany, Indiana fought in numerous battles including marching through Georgia. I have a letter that he wrote while at Chickamagua. He died only two years after the war ended. He is buried in Franklin, Indiana. He was in the 38th Indiana, Co. F volunteer infantry, Scribner’s division.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  8. My great great grandmothers brother Samuel S Wales 2nd Indiana Cav. also captured and survived Andersonville.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  9. Divided family
    My great grandparents married 1891 in St. Louis but with no approval from grandma’s side cause he was a Yankee.
    Jennie Alston of Dyersburg, Tn. Was courted by Orville Bartlow of St. Louis.
    According to family story a soldiers life was spared by a bullet which imbedded in a Bible kept in soldiers breast pocket.
    Jennie told this story so it is assumed it was her father Charles Henry Alston 47th Tennessee and engagement at Shiloh where he was present. Alston left for sick in Alabama and awol thereafter.
    Jennies mothers brother TCS Leach was kia March 4 1864 20th Tenn. Cav. under Bedford Forrest at Yazoo City, Mississippi.
    Wm. H. Bartlow, Orvilles father 6th Minnesota Reg. Co. B fought on 1862 Minnesota Indian wars and Southern campaigns.
    Orvilles mothers family Wales were involved in the UGRR back in Ohio.

    • The story of a bullet stopped by a Bible thereby saving a soldier’s life has cropped up repeatedly in various war stories for various wars over the past some couple of centuries …I have heard of this story for World War II as well as the Civil War, etc.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  10. My great grandfather (paternal) was James A Slaven. He grew up in Oneida, Tn and had a number of brothers and sisters. He went to Camp Hoskins, Pulaski, Ky to join the Union army on Jan 30, 1962. He was 21. He was a PVT in Co I, 12th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry. On May 14, 1864, he was in a battle at Resaca, GA, north of Atlanta, on Sherman’s push to the sea. The wound he received was noted as a flesh wood to the right shoulder. He was sent to rhe rear and to a hospital in Indiana. He later returned to his unit.

    After the war he went to Kansas, where he homesteaded a place just west of Glen Elder, and over time had 12 children, 10 who survived and one who was my paternal Grandfather. At one time James A Slaven accumulated quite a lot of wealth for a farmer in Kansas, though he had arrived there with nothing (1871-1923). His homestead is now under the Glen Elder lake.

    His wife, Emily Williams, lived to be 98 yrs of age in Glen Elder, and was receiving his Civil War pension.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  11. My second great-grandfather was James Brown Rounsaville. He fought for the Confederacy serving for Texas. I have copies of the letters he sent home during the war. The originals are in the US War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He enlisted at age 24 and served in the Thirteenth Cavalry (Burnett’s Regiment, Thirteenth Mounted Volunteers).

    His brother, Thomas Joel Rounsaville also served in the Thirteenth Calvary with his brother. Thomas Joel became sick and died at age 24.
    Buried May 1864 in the Confederate Memorial Cemetery• Keatchie, De Soto Parish, Louisiana.
    2nd Lt Co C 13th TX Cavalry C.S.A. Proud Confederate Soldier Burnett’s Regt, 13rd TX Volunteers; Enrolled May 24, 1862, Houston County, by Capt George English, age 20, value of horse $150, equipment $20;

    Reading the letters of both men, the feeling comes through what it was like for them to be away from their family and for James Brown Rounsaville when he lost his brother.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  12. My second great grandfather was Horace Otis Matthews who enlisted in the Massachusetts Volunteer 30th Infantry Regiment. He was from Abington, MA. He died on board the Str. Iberville of a fever and was buried on the Mississippi River on July 13, 1862

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  13. I had 2 great uncles, brother who fought on opposite sides. Bingham Cushman from Louisiana was captured at the battle at Missionary Ridge. His younger brother, Francis, was with Vermont. Francis’s regiment fought in Louisiana. From newspaper articles I learned that Francis marched past his home.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  14. My great grandmother’s oldest brother, David Judson Goodsell, Jr. served in the Civil War. He would have been living in Cleveland, Ohio at the time, but was born in NYC. He died the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg. Until locating his pension filed for by his father many years later, I didn’t know!

    He was the 4th child of 11 children. The first 3 were girls, an older daughter and then twin girls. 2 sons died as toddlers, the youngest child was a girl, Amelia Frances who died at 10 years old. Her mother died of dysentery a few weeks after her daughter at the age of 45. Sad story!

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  15. My great grandfather Juan Domingo Montoya fought at the battle of Valverde (Fort Craig) NM February 21 1862. He joined the Union side with Hubbell’s 4th Mounted Infantry , then was mustered into the New Mexico 5th Mounted Infantry. Hubbells regiment was one of the first units to reach Ft Craig to fight the “texans” confederate army under Sibley. Historian and author Jerry D. Thompson has him in a few places in his book, “A Civil War History of the New Mexico Volunteers & Milita”.Under Capt. Hubbells exploits, Hubbell reports that he sent his men in all directions to spy on and find the confederates (Texans). Because of the spanish speaking spys the rebels had , Hubbell said his five men squads were sent on “secret Service” missions. They were the best of horsemen and best horses. Doing research on Fold 3 I found his name and discovered his service to our country. In 2018 we discovered his grave on his circa1868 homestead in a canyon he named MOSQUERO. On July 14 2019 the Albuquerque Journal picked my story about finding the grave and ordering a grave marker from the US Govt. on August 3 2019 The family gave him a Christian funeral, the US Army gave him an Honor Guard , 21 gun salute, and flag presentation. They flew in from Fort Bliss Army Base in a Blackhawk helicopter to present this honor.

  16. I have 2 great-grandfathers who served on the Union side, one from Vermont and one from Massachusetts. They were both stationed at Camp Alexandria, outside of Washington D.C. one was a fifer so undoubtedly served in the medical field. Both were in infantry units. Calvin Henry Good was the first and Lyman O. Gunn was the 2nd. I have the Library of Congress records for Grandpa Gunn and plan on ordering the ones for Grandpa Hood this year. Grandpa Gunn kept a diary for 1964 and 1965 that unfortunately slipped out of family hands and was scooped by a dealer in Canada. I have excerpts from it. I could not pay outright, over $400 for the two and the dealer would not deal with me…he said everybody says they are direct family and would not negotiate. Although serving in several actions, he carried malaria the rest of his life and eventually could not keep up his farm. This was a direct result of Camp Alexandria. His story is close to my heart.

  17. I belong to Fold 3 with Ancestry but have never used it Yet. I also belong to the Daughters of the Civil War in Manitowoc, WI. The CW soldier that I would like more information on is David Bemjamin Stillman. 3 Jun 1824 in New York. He died in 10 Mar 1910 at the age of 85, in Bovina, Outagamie, WI. He elistment 30 Aug 1864 as a private from Wi. Compant E Infantry. Mustered out 20 Jun 1865.
    He also was a member of the GAR of Appleton, WI.
    This is all I know. but I would like to learn about him.
    Sincerely Thanking you.

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  18. My great-great Uncle, George Brewster Caswell, was a member of the 20th Maine Infantry. He fought in 19 engagements over his time with the regiment, including being on Little Round Top during the Battle of Gettysburg. He was in Company E. He married after the war but never had children. In a letter to his niece, he noted that he did not want his children to go through what he had. He lived until 1914.

  19. My great grandfather, Richard Holmes Gaulden, was a soldier in the 21st Mississippi regiment CSA. He was killed at the Battle of Wilderness on May 6, 1864 leaving his wife and 12 yr. old son. I know this regiment belonged to Humphrey’s brigade, Longstreet’s corps at time of his death so I’m assuming he was killed in fighting around the widow Tapp farm near Orange Plank Road – Brock Road intersection when Longstreet came up from Gordonsville. Any more info appreciated. Thank you for everything you are doing!

  20. My great great grandfather Isaac Ayers but for the confederacy he was from outside Bristol Virginia his twin Adam Ayers fought for the union although I have never found any records for him just many family stories Isaac‘s service was dotted with bouts of dysentery and he eventually returned home prior to the close of the warBecause of the dysentery

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  21. My Grandfather, Edward Archbald, joined the 13th Massachussetts Infantry as a private and served under Captain Jackson. He was 25 Years old when the war broke out and was working in New Orleans. He immediately headed home to Boston and enlisted. He was wounded at Antietam and was sent home to recover. He reenlisted and fought at Gettysburg. When He was discharged he was still a private. After returning to Hopkinton, MA he decided to Join his uncles’s firm in Montreal. Frothingham and Workman. He rose to be President of the firm and died in Montreal at age 86 in 1924. He applied for a disability pension and maintained his American citizen ship

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  22. An amazing idea but I have an issue with the graphics.
    Everyone knows the North is blue and the South is gray.
    But here the South is red and the rest of the pie is gray.
    Pick white or pale yellow or something else neutral for the background and stick to blue and gray for the main characters please!

  23. My g-g-grandfather, Elihu Pinckney Jones served in the SC James Battalion under Longstreet. I have his original letters written home as well as his diary, both from 1862 thru 1864 when he was wounded in the right elbow at 2nd Deep Bottom. The miniball was left in the bone and eventually became septic, causing his death in 1893. He was a newlywed when he enlisted in Charleston, SC and his letters are descriptive, poignant and quite loving, all addressed to his wife, “My Beloved.” My mother had a small gold ladies pocket watch (which I still have) with amethyst and diamond forget-ne-nots on the outside and inscribed inside to “My Beloved.” We had no idea where it came from until we found the letters and diary in an attic in 2011! Such treasures!

    • Thank you for sharing your powerful story! We’d love to capture the details you’ve researched and invite you to visit this link to add your story/photos/documentation to be included when we roll out the phase that includes individual soldiers. Together, we will make this a powerful research tool! https://www.ancestry.com/civil-war-stories/add-photo

  24. Jenny, I am writing one of my monthly columns (‘The Source’), which will appear in the June 2020 edition of “Civil War News.” A question, when selecting, for example, the 28th NC Infantry during the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, on the right of the screen, beneath the outline map of NC, two lines exist. When hovering over the lines, a pop-up appears amCharts. Do users need to download software to utilize this feature, or is this a work in progress? Thanks for your assistance!

  25. P.S. Is the ‘Gallery’ feature still in progress?

    Thank you!!

    • Hi Michael, We are in the very first phase of the Civil War Stories project and these features are still in progress. Please feel free to reach out to Anne Mitchell, one of our Civil War experts, if we can be of further help. Thanks. [email protected]

  26. very interesting information. this is a history that cannot be forgotten.
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  27. My great maternal grandfathers Josiah Covington, and William H Ray great paternal grandfather served in the Southern Confederacy during the Civil War. Josiah Covington enlisted in Company A 42nd Virginia Infantry in January 1863. William H. Rea joined Company H 24th Virginia Infantry in March 1862.
    During Josiah’s service, he could have participated in the Battle of Chancellorsville, May 1863, Battle of Gettysburg, July 1863; Battle of Cold Harbor May/June 1864; and Siege of Petersburg/Richmond, June 15, 1864 – April 2, 1865. As he was present for duty during this period, I can and do assume he participated in these various battles.
    He was wounded in the Cold Harbor Battle and hospitalized and furloughed for 15 days. He returned to duty and participated in the Siege of Petersburg – Richmond June 15, 1864, to April 2, 1865. He was again wounded and captured in April 1865, and become a POW at Pt. Lookout prison camp. When the south surrendered, he was admitted to USA Hospital in Richmond, Virginia, and released from the hospital to return home. Josiah died from complications of his wounds in August 1894.
    William H. Rea would enlist in the Company H 24th Virginia Infantry in March 1862. In May 1864, William was captured and sent to Pt. Lookout prison camp.
    Death, illness, and starvation were always present in the prison camps during the Civil War. William spent about six months as a POW at Point Lookout Virginia before volunteering for the 4th USV infantry who were called Galvanized Yankees.
    In October 1864, William was released from Point Lookout and transferred to Norfolk, Virginia, serving in the Quarter Master department after volunteering and joining the 4th USV Infantry Regiment and were assigned to the western frontier.
    Traveling to St. Louis by train, they then boarded the riverboat Mars and moved to Sioux City, Dakota Territory. They went up the Missouri River in the riverboat Belle Peoria to Fort Rice, North Dakota. A sizable Indian force attacked the fort five days after they arrived. The attack was repulsed but left one soldier dead and four wounded by arrows. The soldiers of the 4th realized that the duty on the western frontier would be dangerous.
    The companies of the regiment moved to Fort Berthold, North Dakota, Fort Sully, South Dakota, and Fort Randall South Dakota. Theses forts were in horrible condition. Death and injury from Indian attacks were not common, but disease, especially dysentery, and smallpox were common. After a year on the frontier, the companies of the 4th United States Volunteers were called to Fort Leavenworth in June and July 1866 and mustered out.
    William H. Rae, Corporal in Co B 4th USV infantry, was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth in June 1866. He returned to Henry County, Virginia, married, and fathered two sons and four daughters. His wife, Mary Ann Newman, died in June 1885. Wiliam never remarried and raised his children alone. William died in 1912.

  28. Andrea Solarz Yes. Atherton Clark was my GG Uncle’s commanding officer. I don’t know if he recruited Brewster or not. the story goes that Brewster went to enlist in a New Hampshire regiment but they were full. So he went to Maine thinking that since the regiment was the 20th from Maine he might not get into too much fighting. Boy was he wrong.

  29. My great grandfather was from Alabama and served in the 12th Alabama Infantry nearly the entire war. His name was Christopher Columbus Davis and was called C.C. by close friends. Captured just days before the surrender at Appomattox, he later was released and walked home to Alabama.

    I would be grateful for any information you may have uncovered!

  30. My third great uncle was a confederate . He served the south bravely died in Champ Chase Prison. Company E, 16th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Private Hezekiah Adkins III. Wayne, West Virginia.

  31. I have 4 g-grandfathers that fought in the CW.
    First is g-grandfather Andrew Dixon Bryce.
    He joined NY !st Vol. Calvary, Co. H on
    July 27, 1863.in Deposit, NY. he was
    mustered out as Sergt. on July 20, 1865.
    He fought in 40 of the fieriest battles of the war.
    After the war, he returned to McClure, NY,
    Married Eunice Rosencrants and they had 9 children.
    He was a lumberman and farmer. He also was a
    Broome County Supervisor, becoming Chairman.
    He died in 1915.

  32. My grandfather, Lewis (Olson) Nelson born in Christiana, Norway and came to the US with his parents in 1856. He enlisted in Dec 12, 1861, He left home without his fathers consent. He was only 15 so his uncle John Olson signed thus the name Olson. He was a Drummer Boy first in Co C US 13th Inf later in Co H. He reenlisted Feb 1864 He was at Vicksburg where he became sick and suffered the rest of his life. He was referred to as the White Haired Norweigen Drummer Boy. He was discharged at Fort Benton Montana Feb 1867. While at Vicksburg a soldier by the name of James Kephart in his Company earned the Congressional Medal of Honor, the soldier is buried in the cemetery of my home town.

  33. Great project and looking forward to see it. Thank you for taking it on as consolidating all those records will be a challenge.

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